University of Iowa School of Management Commencement – May 15, 2015

University of Iowa School of Management Commencement – May 15, 2015


– Good morning, everyone. You may be seated. My name is David Frasier
and I have the privilege to serve as the Associate Dean of the Tippie School of Management. On behalf of the faculty and staff of the Henry B. Tippie
School of Management, I welcome the soon-to-be graduates, families, friends, and significant others to our 2015 Spring Commencement. It’s particularly gratifying to see so many children in the audience. And graduates, congratulations on modeling the value of education
for the next generation, because we do need to keep
this process continuing, and we need to continue to educate. So thank you for bringing your families. This event celebrates
the great achievements of the graduates from all of our Tippie School of Management MBA programs. These programs include the full-time MBA, the MBA for Professionals and Managers with locations in Cedar Rapids, Des Moines, and the Quad Cities, the Executive MBA program with locations in Iowa
City and Des Moines, the Hong Kong MBA program, and the CIMBA MBA part and full-time programs in Italy. The diversity of our
programs is our strength that allows us to reach and
touch many stakeholders, particularly in this period
of persistent global change. In this regard, we offer one MBA degree, the University of Iowa Masters of Business Administration in all of these programs, and united by a common vision, goals,
and value proposition. As you can see from the
flags displayed here today, which represent the
current countries of origin of our new Tippie graduates, the Tippie MBA is truly
an international program dedicated to producing global managers with the capability to compete in today’s global marketplace. It is wonderful to have
family and friends here from all over the world, along with our faculty and staff to acknowledge the accomplishments of this year’s graduates. The ultimate objective for our graduates is to add value with integrity,
innovation, and impact to their families, the
companies that hire them, and to society at large. You, the graduates, have
earned this celebration as the culmination of your hard work, and we are very proud to add you to the worldwide Tippie alumni family. At this point, it’s my distinct pleasure to introduce my colleagues
on the platform. Please stand as I read your name. Sarah Fisher Gardial, Dean, Henry B. Tippie College of Business. Perry Glasgow, Vice
President and Controller, Harley-Davidson Incorporated, our keynote speaker for today. Barry Butler, Executive
Vice President and Provost, the University of Iowa. Kurt Anstreicher, Senior Associate Dean, Henry B. Tippie College of Business. Jennifer Blackhurst, Visiting Professor and Faculty Director of the Strategic
Innovation Career Academy, and that academy is
transitioning, as of next fall, to be the Business Analytics Academy. Thomas Gruca, Professor, Director of the PhD Program in Marketing, and Faculty Director of the Marketing Career Academy. Phil Jones, Professor,
Management Sciences. Amy Kristof-Brown, Professor and Departmental
Executive Officer, Management and Organizations. Mark Pennell, Professor, Accounting. Tom Rietz, Professor and Faculty Director of the Finance Career Academy. John Solow, Professor and Departmental Executive
Officer, Economics. And now, staff of the
School of Management. David Deyak, Assistant Dean of the
full-time MBA program. Colleen Downie, Assistant Dean of the Professionals and
Managers MBA program. Dawn Kluber, Assistant Dean of the
Executive MBA program. Jan Fasse, Business Director of the
Marketing Career Academy. Jana Klauke, Director of Career Services. Michel Pontarelli, Director of the Quad
Cities MBA-PM program. Nicole Vogt, Director of the Cedar Rapids MBA program. Steve Waite, Business Director of the Strategic
Innovation Career Academy. Mark Winkler, Director of the Business Solutions Center. Catherine Zaharis, Business Director of the
Finance Career Academy. And Michael Williams, Director of the Des Moines MBA program. I would now like to ask the Dean of the Henry B. Tippie College of Business to say a few words of welcome, then introduce our keynote
commencement speaker. Ladies and gentlemen, please join me in welcoming Dean Sarah Gardial. (audience applauses) – [Sarah Gardial] Good
morning to everyone. I want to extend a hearty
welcome to all of you who are visitors here,
who are friends, family, and loved ones of our graduates today. This is always a highlight of my year. This particular ceremony,
and one of the best things about it is the coming
together of a whole lot of people who allowed
our graduates to be here, and that includes my
colleagues on the stage who are exemplary, who it
is my privilege and pride to get to work with, but
it also includes you. It took us all, and I wanna thank you for being here to participate in this. I do have a couple of
words for the graduates. David Frasier mentioned that we’ve got three different programs
that are mixed here, and one might say that
there are as many goals of these graduates as
there are individuals, but if I can throw
things into two buckets, one of the things that
I can say about people that choose to come back
and do an MBA program, typically have one or
two big goals in mind and for many of our graduates, the idea of the MBA with the breadth and the opportunity that it provides is to invest in themselves
in a way to come back and really hit a reset button, and really maybe change the path in a significantly different way than what they were doing
before they came to us, and to be able to walk out the door and do something that
they can only imagine before they started the program with us. For some of the graduates, it’s a little bit more simple in the sense that they were already on their path. They are in a company or an industry that they’re already excited about, and what they needed was that MBA to really help them
step on the accelerator, open some doors that
wouldn’t have been open for them as easily, and
it’s a matter of just moving more quickly and more
progressively on a path that they had already
imagined, and already been on. Regardless of which of
those two categories you find yourself in,
this is obviously a time to not just reflect on what you’ve done for the past couple of
years in our program, but where you’re going,
and what your goals and accomplishments might be. What’s your vision? What are you heading for here? And, I just want to tell a story that’s a favorite of mine and one that I’d like to remind myself of, because I think it really
encompasses this idea of what our goals should be, as we’re thinking ahead, and thinking about what kind of mark we want to make in the world. The story goes like this. Rabbi Mordecai, sadly, dies and goes to Heaven. And he is waiting around for the interview with the big guy and he’s got a lot of
time to think about this. He knows he’s gonna be quizzed about what happened in his life on Earth, and what he accomplished, and is he gonna be able to stay in Heaven or take another path. He starts getting nervous about it because he’s got a little bit
too much time to think. So he starts thinking
about all of the people that he considered great in his life and comparing himself to them, and what he imagines is that when he steps up in front of God, God’s gonna look down at him and say, “Why weren’t you as wise as Solomon?” or “Why weren’t you the great leader “that Moses was?” or “Why didn’t you leave a
legacy like King David?” And he starts to get really concerned because in comparison
to those great people in his mind, he is just absolutely sure that he is gonna come up short. And he gets a surprise. The surprise is when he finally makes his way up through the queue, and he stands there in front of God. God looks down at him and he doesn’t say, “Why weren’t you Moses or
Solomon or King David?” He says, “Why weren’t you Rabbi Mordecai?” And that is it. We are all just called to be the very best people that we can be. And we all bring different gifts, different experiences,
different challenges to that as surely as our
thumbprints are different. The kinds of impact that we can make, the heights to which we can raise our own accomplishments
is completely individual. That is the thought that I
wanna leave with you today, is to reflect on how you can be your very best self. The second thing that I
wanna leave with you is as you’re having this
thought about your goals and ambitions, is to think holistically about the mark that you wanna make as a human being, and not
just as a business person. That might be a surprise coming from the Dean of the
Business College here. This morning, as I was working out over at the student rec
center, I saw, yet again, another tribute to David Goldberg, who recently, tragically
passed away, accidentally, was CEO of Survey Monkey and the husband of Sheryl Sandberg. I’ve heard a lot of
these over the last week, and every one of them talks about what a phenomenal businessman he was. He was visionary, he knew
how to disrupt industries, he was out there, literally
at the top of his game in terms of what he was accomplishing in his professional career. And, they always say,
great husband and father, and a really good guy. You can’t hear a tribute to him without those last two
pieces being thrown in, and you really can think about what you’re going to accomplish
in all of those ways, and I would certainly encourage you to make that kind of mark in your own unique way
as you move forward. Now, it is my privilege to
introduce our speaker today. Some of you know I’m a
motorcycle person, all right? And I will tell you that
when people find this out about me, they have two questions. I always get them, it’s 100% of the time. The first one is a little
bit annoying to me. When they find out that I
like to ride motorcycles, the first question they always ask is, “Do you have your own motorcycle “or do you ride behind your husband?” (audience laughs) I asked my husband once. I said, “When you tell people “that you ride a motorcycle, “how many of them ask
if you ride behind me?” (audience laughs) He never gets that question. I don’t know, it’s the damnedest thing. Anyway, that’s the annoying
question that I get. And, yes, I have my own motorcycle. The second question is
the one that actually is a source of a bit of
shame and embarrassment for me because what they say is, “What kind of motorcycle do you have?” They really don’t want
to ask me that question. What they wanna ask me is, “Do you have a Harley?” And I don’t. So I always have this moment where I just have to confess that I’m not cool enough to have a Harley. So these are the two
questions that I always get and my dream is that someday I’m gonna be able to
say, “I have a Harley,” and all that other stuff will go away. It is my delight to introduce our speaker today from Harley-Davidson. Perry Glasgow is the Vice
President and Controller of the Harley-Davidson Corporation in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. He has held this position
since January 2010, and he is responsible
for financial planning, financial reporting and analysis, and cost management for the company. Prior to that position, he was treasurer, where he was responsible for all treasury cash management and
capital market activities. In addition to his treasury activities, he also served as interim
CFO and interim President of Harley-Davidson Financial Services Inc. He began his career at
Harley-Davidson in 1992, and has held a variety of positions there, including Vice President
for Strategic Planning. Prior to joining Harley-Davidson, Perry worked in public accounting at Ernst & Young and Itel Corporation, where he held various financial positions. He received his BBA from
the University of Iowa, and his MBA from the
Kellogg Graduate School of Business at Northwestern University. Perry is a member of the advisory board to the American Financial
Services Association Fixed Income Investor Conferences and he’s a member of their Financial
Relations Committee. I’m also pleased to
say that he is a member of our School of Management
Advisory Counsel, and I’ll throw in this
last personal piece. If anyone wants to hook up with Perry at a Hawkeye football game, you walk into the tailgating section and you look up at the flags and you find the Harley flag with the tiger hawk underneath it. And that’s where Perry is gonna be for every home game. It is my great pleasure to introduce a wonderful alum and a great friend of the Tippie College of Business, Perry Glasgow. (audience applauses) (“Born to be Wild” by Steppenwolf) – (laughs) Morning, everybody. (audience applauses) That’s a heck of a way
to start a celebration, so we gotta keep this going ’cause that may be the
best part of this speech. (audience laughs) Anyway, thank you, Sarah, for the nice, warm introduction. I’m extremely honored to
be here with you today and have the privilege of addressing this year’s graduating class. However, Sarah, you
missed the third question that everybody generally asks. And that is, “Do you have a tattoo?” (audience laughs) – [Sarah] I’m not saying.
– (laughs) Ok. (audience laughs) Thought I’d try and put her on the spot for a second. Anyway, in May of 2001,
I was in a very similar situation as everybody in the audience. I was sitting in an auditorium, as a new business school graduate, listening to a speaker
I’d never heard of before. When all I really wanted to do was walk across the
stage, receive my diploma, and celebrate with family and friends. Since most of you probably
feel that same way today, I’m gonna keep my remarks very brief. I will talk a little bit about my career and offer up some very simple advice on becoming a better leader. But first, I’d like to
congratulate all of you on getting here today. You are graduating from one of the best business schools in the country, and you should be very proud
of this accomplishment. Congratulations. (claps) (audience applauses) I’m sure you also realize
you wouldn’t be here today without the help,
support, and encouragement from your family and friends. So let’s give them a round of applause to show them how much we appreciate their support and sacrifices. (claps) (audience applauses) I’m gonna first start off by talking about my career path. I consider myself to be very lucky. I believe I work for the
best company in the world and have a great job. During my almost 30-year career, I’ve worked for only three companies, and in each and every one, I’ve enjoyed each and every one of them. To give you a feel how
I’ve approached my career and managed my career, I’m gonna equate it to how people plan motorcycle rides. There are as many different
ways to approach a ride, as there are motorcyclists. There are two main categories. First type is a rider
who picks a destination and plans every step
of the ride in advance. They make all of their hotel reservations, determine where and when they will stop for breakfast and lunch, where and when they will use the bathroom, which dealerships to stop
by and visit along the way, and probably most importantly, which drinking establishments
they will frequent that night to relive the day’s ride. If they run into a
detour, they will adjust but get back on their main
route as soon as they can. This type of rider’s
focused and has a plan that gets them to their destination. The second type of rider
is a little more laid back. They still pick a destination but most of the trip is
determined day-to-day. They won’t have specific
stops along the way but, instead, will stop when they see something interesting. Breakfast, lunch, and even bathroom breaks can be alongside the road. They can take backroads and look at detours as new adventures. They don’t follow a detailed plan, just a general plan that gets
them to their destination. And on occasion, will
even change their plans and arrive at an
altogether new destination. So which path did I take with my career? I took the more casual approach, which I might add, is the same way I plan my motorcycle trips. But when I graduated from Iowa in 1986, I never dreamed I’d be a
controller, treasurer, CFO, or president of a company, in fact, those positions were the
furthest thing from my mind. All I really wanted to do is graduate, move to Chicago, and have fun. Yet I was, indeed, able to achieve these career milestones. So, how did I get there? I believe there were four
key factors that helped me to achieve success,
and that others can use to achieve success in their careers. First, you need to have
a very strong work ethic and desire to get things done, but at the same time, you need to respect the needs of others along the way. It’s not about getting
things done at all cost. It’s about getting things
done the right way. Second, you need to
have an unyielding focus on personal integrity and honesty. Don’t ever compromise your integrity and honesty for anyone. If you ever find yourself
in that position, I’d advise you it’s time
to find a new company. Third, you need to be very flexible, and look for opportunities
that challenge you and allow you to make a
difference at the company. Also, don’t be afraid to
take risks along the way. My career’s been marked
by a lot of risk-taking. When I left Ernst & Young, I went to work for Itel Company which was one year out of bankruptcy. When I left Itel, I
went to work for Harley where we were starting
up a finance company where Harley was only an equity investor with no guarantee of future investments, and it worked out great for me. Lastly, and I’ve had a lot of this, you need to have luck in your career. Sorry about this. Anyway, the bottom line to all of this, is there is no righter way to plan and manage your career. You need to select an approach that works best for you, consistent with your
character, personality, outlook on life, and career aspirations. Like me, I’m sure all of you are proud of your accomplishments. But as graduates from one of the leading MBA programs in the country, I’m sure you have a desire
to become a great leader, whether at a Fortune 500 company, in private practice, a family business, or as a stay-at-home parent. But why do we need to be great leaders, and what does it take
to be a great leader? The first question for
me is rather simple. Great leaders create environments that foster employee
engagement, which leads to satisfied customers and
proved business results. And satisfied customers
and strong earnings are what we strive for
in the business world. The second question, however, is a little harder to answer. Although I could discuss several factors I think it takes to be a great leader, I’m gonna highlight two
that I’m focusing on to improve my own
leadership effectiveness. The first factor, for
me, is self-awareness. You first need to understand yourself and how you impact those around you to be an effective leader. You can’t truly lead others
until you know yourself. This may sound simple, but as a leader, it’s often times difficult to seek candid feedback from your staff and peers, so that you can improve yourself, and ultimately your organization. What I found to be helpful,
is just simply asking for the feedback and improvement ideas. However, for that to be effective, you need to first develop trust. You can do this by
providing a safe environment for them to give constructive feedback, and then demonstrate your commitment by actually acting on
their recommendations. To me, that’s the key
point that many people and organizations miss. It’s not just about
listening to the employees. It’s also about acting
on those recommendations. Once you’ve established trust, and they see that you
will act on the feedback they’ve given you, you
will get the feedback you need to become a much better leader. The second factor is servant leadership. I’m a very big believer in the philosophy of servant leadership. But what does being a servant leader mean, and how do I think it can help us to become great leaders? Simply put, a servant leader is one who puts the needs of others first. Servant leadership turns a traditional leadership
model upside down. Instead of having the leader
at the top of the pyramid, servant leadership turns
the pyramid upside down, with the leader on the bottom, supporting the organization. This is exactly what we
do at Harley-Davidson. We have an inverted pyramid structure, where we, as leaders, do all we can to support the needs of the employees. I’m gonna highlight this
with a couple of examples. At each of our plants, every employee on the production line
can, and is required to stop the line if they
experience or see issues. It is then the responsibility
of the employees, the team leader, or the plant manager to resolve the issue
before restarting the line. In that sense, the
employees’ needs have to be resolved so we can
produce quality motorcycles. This philosophy was
implemented several years ago, and today, our plants are more efficient than any time in our history, and our employee
engagement scores continue to trend up, although we still
have a lot of work to do. The second example’s gonna be a little bit closer to home for everybody here in Iowa. I’m sure everybody knows Dan Gable. Growing up in Iowa, as short as I am, it was natural that I would
gravitate towards wrestling. Dan Gable has always been
an inspiration to me. His ability to lead young people to be the best they can be, and the results he’s
achieved is truly remarkable. In his recent book, A Wrestling Life, he shares a story of Barry Davis and his struggle to make weight on the eve of the 1982
Big Ten championships. As the story goes, Davis was struggling to
make weight and decides, the night before the team
is scheduled to leave for the Big Ten tournament,
that he’d had it and he wasn’t gonna wrestle anymore. Gable tracked him down at
the Hy Vee and found him with a couple of bags of
groceries in his hands, and instead of yelling at the young man about letting his teammates,
coaches, and fans down, Gable asked him, “What do you want to do?” That, right there, is
true servant leadership, focusing on meeting the
needs of an individual wrestler before his own needs are met, or, in this case, the needs of the team. This may be one of the reasons Gable has been so
successful over the years. He puts the needs and development of the wrestlers first, and by doing so, he ultimately achieves team
and individual successes. In this story, Davis goes
on to win an NCAA title and the team wins its
fifth straight NCAA title. So, in my view, self-awareness and servant leadership are key factors in becoming a great leader. Today, I view myself as a good leader but I have a lot of work
to do to be a great leader. But the challenge, to me, is worth it, to improve myself and Harley-Davidson. The final piece of advice I have for you is to have fun and approach work with a good sense of humor. Work can be stressful, and
a little humor can relieve the stress as well as lead
to greater productivity. A recently-retired CEO, Keith Wandell, is a great leader, and
probably the best leader I’ve ever worked with. He led Harley through
some pretty rough times, and he focused the organization on employee diversity and
developing great leaders. But he was also very good at making the workplace fun while, at the same time, delivering an impactful message. I’ve spent the last several
minutes giving you advice, so I’d like to share a
little bit of the advice Keith gave me a few years ago. In 2009, I was having a
hard time making a decision on whether or not I should shift gears and go from being the
treasurer of the company to being the controller. Keith strolled into my office
to see if he could help with my decision-making process. And at Harley, we don’t have doors so there was no way for
me to keep Keith out even if I wanted to. He listened to me for a
few minutes and then said, “Perry, you have been
a fantastic treasurer, “and you can continue to
be a fantastic treasurer “and retire from Harley-Davidson, “knowing you had a tremendous impact “on the success of the company.” At that state, I was feeling
really good about myself, chest pumped out, thinking this was great. Our new CEO had just
told me how great I was. And had he stopped there, I probably would’ve stayed
in the treasurer role. But he didn’t stop there. He continued on by
saying, “Or you can grow “a backbone and take on
a controller position “and show us what you really can do.” (audience laughs) That’s how I became the controller of Harley-Davidson. In conclusion, pick a career
path that works for you, get to know yourself and how you impact those around you, and dedicate yourself to being a great servant leader. Thank you for listening to me today. I, again, would like to congratulate all of you on your accomplishments, and I wish you the best
of luck in your careers. If, in the coming years, things get rough, just remember our motto at Harley, “Screw it, let’s ride.” Thank you. (audience laughs and applauses) – [Sarah Gardial] Provost Butler, will you join me at this time, please? Now’s the good stuff. Will the candidates for the degree, Master of Business
Administration, please rise. Provost Butler. These candidates, having completed all the requirements for the degree, Master of Business Administration, are recommended to you by the faculty of the Henry B. Tippie College of Business for the conferral of the degree. – On the recommendation of the faculty of the Henry B. Tippie College of Business and by the authority vested in me by the Board of Regents, State of Iowa, I confer on each of you, the degree, Master of Business Administration, as qualified and designated. Congratulations. (audience applauses) Will the graduates please be seated? The graduates will now be introduced by Michael Williams. – [Michael Williams] As our
graduates are introduced today, you’ll notice that some are wearing gold chords on their robes. These chords identify those graduates whose high level of academic achievement in the MBA program has earned the designation of
graduating with Distinction. Ladies and gentlemen, it
is my pleasure to introduce the Tippie School of
Management MBA Class of 2015. Families and friends,
your applause and cheers are strongly encouraged. This is a time for celebration. (violin music) Alyssa Adams. (audience cheers and applauses) Evan Allrich. (audience applauses) Rich Andersen. (audience applauses) Erik Ashby. (audience applauses) Karen Austin. (audience applauses) Christopher Baker. (audience applauses) Kapil Balani. (audience applauses) Damodara Battula. (audience applauses) Robert Beckman. (audience applauses) Neel Behere. (audience applauses) Lisa Bender. (audience cheers and applauses) Douglas Bossen. (audience cheers and applauses) Lisa Brown. (audience applauses) Matthew Brown. (audience cheers and applauses) Manuel Camacho. (audience applauses) Catherine Carlson. (audience cheers and applauses) Jenniffer Carpe. (audience applauses) Dinesh Balani. (audience applauses) Anbarasu Chandran. (audience applauses) Josh Chapman. (audience applauses) Charlie Chiappetta. (audience applauses) Jon Childers. (audience applauses) Brian Clark. (audience applauses) Matthew Coffey. (audience applauses) Adam Conzemius. (audience applauses) Aubray Coorough. (audience applauses) Oliverio Covarrubias. (audience applauses) Qi Alice Cui. (audience applauses) Allan Dantas. (audience applauses) Ryan Delaney. (audience applauses) Angella Dieterich. (audience applauses) Jarom Dilworth. (audience applauses) Donna Dolan. (audience applauses) Ethan Domke. (audience applauses) Gui Earn Dong. (audience applauses) Amber Dawn Doyle. (audience applauses) Daniel Dungan. (audience applauses) Phil Edman. (audience cheers and applauses) Michael Emgarten. (audience cheers and applauses) Brian Engler. (audience applauses) Gregory Fett. (audience cheers and applauses) Ben Fish. (audience cheers and applauses) Michael Fleagle. (audience applauses) Patrick Forner. (audience applauses) Vighneshwar Gadde Ganapati. (audience applauses) Fred Gingerich. (audience applauses) Michael Giudici. (audience applauses) Dennis Goad, Junior. (audience cheers and applauses) Robert Godbersen. (audience cheers and applauses) Chandramohan Govindarajan. (audience applauses) Anuja Goyal. (audience applauses) Ryan Griffin. (audience applauses) Jason Haase. (audience applauses) Samuel Hanselman. (audience applauses) Tami Harmsen. (audience applauses) Sarah Haugen. (audience applauses) Mary Beth Hayes. (audience cheers and applauses) John Herendeen. (audience applauses) Chris Hoffman. (audience cheers and applauses) Nicholas Howald. (audience cheers and applauses) Brendan Hughes. (audience applauses) Joshua Jacobs. (audience cheers and applauses) Peter Jeffries. (audience cheers and applauses) Julie Jensen. (audience cheers and applauses) Michelle Jensen. (audience applauses) Scott Jensen. (audience applauses) Guang Jin. (audience applauses) Kimberly Johnson. (audience applauses) Neil Joss. (audience cheers and applauses) Nate Kaeding. (audience cheers and applauses) James Kain. (audience applauses) Matthew Karlen. (audience applauses) Pradeep Katturupalli. (audience applauses) Mary Kempf. (audience applauses) Carol Kersey. (audience applauses) Justin Knight. (audience applauses) Anna Konchar. (audience applauses) Priya Kondasani. (audience applauses) Jeff Krafka. (audience cheers and applauses) Dave Krones. (audience cheers and applauses) Girish Kulkarni. (audience applauses) Rajeev Kumar. (audience applauses) Kwan Lee. (audience applauses) Jeremy Leifker. (audience cheers and applauses) Cedric Leviner. (audience applauses) William Livingston. (audience cheers and applauses) Heather Loftsgard. (audience cheers and applauses) Yunnie Low. (audience applauses) Katie Lueken. (audience cheers and applauses) Rachel Maassen. (audience cheers and applauses) Kiron Madasu. (audience applauses) David Maddox. (audience applauses) Pragya Malhotra. (audience applauses) Jennifer McAhren. (audience applauses) Justin McDermott. (audience applauses) Michael Meinecke. (audience applauses) David Meyer. (audience applauses) Sampada Mhatre. (audience applauses) Anne Mikesell. (audience cheers and applauses) Derek Miller. (audience applauses) Joseph Miller. (audience applauses) Margaret Mills. (audience applauses) Sanjay Mittal. (audience cheers and applauses) Elizabeth Moore. (audience cheers and applauses) Bryce Morgan. (audience cheers and applauses) Aaron Morrow. (audience cheers and applauses) Matthew Mowry. (audience applauses) Jeremy Murdock. (audience cheers and applauses) Irakli Naridze. (audience cheers and applauses) Mark Nelson. (audience applauses) Shivraj Nimbalkar. (audience cheers and applauses) Cheryl Nuno. (audience applauses) Jeff Opsal. (audience applauses) Anne Parmley. (audience applauses) Prithviraj Patankar. (audience applauses) Deepak Patnam. (audience applauses) Valerij Petrulevich. (audience cheers and applauses) Roberto Pino. (audience cheers and applauses) Adam Price. (audience applauses) Jon Raftis. (audience applauses) Nithin Rajesekar. (audience applauses) Edward Reading. (audience cheers and applauses) Beth Redfearn. (audience applauses) Michael Redmond. (audience cheers and applauses) Eric Reinsch. (audience cheers and applauses) Ashley Rooney. (audience applauses) Peter Roth. (audience applauses) Anthony Royster. (audience cheers and applauses) Karen Rubel. (audience applauses) Amitesh Sahu. (audience applauses) Dylan Salisbury. (audience cheers and applauses) Bob Sanders. (audience cheers and applauses) Michael Scebold. (audience cheers and applauses) Jared Scheckel. (audience cheers and applauses) Scott Schmidt. (audience applauses) Martina Schubert. (audience cheers and applauses) Tracy Scott. (audience applauses) Thomas Seaberg. (audience applauses) Nirmal Sharma Chapagai. (audience applauses) Freeland Shaw. (audience cheers and applauses) Austin Shears. (audience applauses) Sarah Shelton. (audience cheers and applauses) Karl Shepherd. (audience applauses) Phillip Sherman. (audience applauses) Allison Smith. (audience cheers and applauses) Joshua Smith. (audience applauses) Rachel Sola Valencia. (audience applauses) Sandy Stewart. (audience applauses) Seth Stone. (audience applauses) Ryan Swalve. (audience cheers and applauses) Aarthi Thiruvengadam. (audience cheers and applauses) Larry Thumann III. (audience cheers and applauses) Jeffrey Tjebkes. (audience cheers and applauses) Lawrence Trosen. (audience applauses) Kyle Tucker. (audience applauses) Smitha Varghese. (audience applauses) Sunitha Vasudevan. (audience applauses) Nicholas Viner. (audience cheers and applauses) Jeetu Virwani. (audience applauses) Eric Wagner. (audience applauses) Adam Walter. (audience applauses) Aaron Warner. (audience cheers and applauses) Rachel Holland Watson. (audience cheers and applauses) Jennifer Weber. (audience cheers and applauses) Tim Wesbrook. (audience applauses) Chad White. (audience applauses) Allan Wiens. (audience applauses) Alexis Woodley. (audience applauses) Mei Ching Yau. (audience cheers and applauses) Daniel Yu. (audience applauses) Nchekwube Ngini. (audience applauses) – [David Frasier] I was getting worried we wouldn’t have any selfies, so I’m glad the last guy
in line did the selfie. We’re gonna give the last of our graduates just a couple of minutes to cycle through. They’re getting their pictures taken in the back there as well. But I would like to
take a couple of minutes to say thank you to so many people in this School of Management organization. Two years ago today, my
wife and I were furiously packing boxes back in the
Buffalo, New York area to make the move out here. The last two years have
just been a lot of fun. I think we have
accomplished a lot together but there are so many
players in what we do here. First of all, of course we
have to thank the faculty. Without them, we wouldn’t
have the transfer of knowledge that takes
place so effectively, and we know it’s going
to serve our graduates so well throughout their careers. Then, there’s the tremendous staff of the School of
Management, and it has been, particularly this last year, very exciting as we have a lot of initiatives under way, a lot of great things that
are going on in the school. Most of, actually, all of the people who have been orchestrating
this event today, are staff from the School of Management. There were many on the auditorium floor, in addition to those that were represented here on the platform. There’s one final graduate
that I have to recognize. This person is graduating
in a little different way than our MBAs, but as I came onboard I had a person on my staff who, basically, helped me get oriented to everything in the Associate Dean’s role. She has been responsible
for detail after detail after detail of things that go on, usually very much in the background. But she coordinates
everything that has happened today and leading up to today. I just wanna recognize Sue Leicher. Sue,
(audience applauses) I’m gonna ask you to come up here, please. (claps) Sue doesn’t have a Harley to do it with but she’s about to ride
off into the sunset in the southwest corner of Utah. We’re very much going to
miss all of the coordination and all of the support
that she gives to us in the school, and for me personally. The one little detail that
I managed to sneak in, I don’t know if she noticed me or not, but this was a detail especially for her. (audience applauses) Graduates, the real key
to success is having a top-notch admin, ok? (laughs) (audience laughs) Graduates, will you please rise? Audience, please join me in congratulating the MBA Class of 2015. (audience cheers and applauses) Graduates and audience, you may, now, all be seated. Graduates, as new alumni
of the University of Iowa and the Tippie College of Business, I hope you will remain
connected to your alma mater, to each other, and to our
global alumni network. I also hope you will
remain true to the three Is of the college, Integrity,
Innovation, and Impact. Samuel Johnson, the 18th
century English poet, essayist, and moralist said, “Integrity, without knowledge,
is weak and useless, “and knowledge, without integrity, “is dangerous and dreadful.” I trust you will build your
personal and professional lives on a foundation of integrity, striving for innovation, and
affecting a positive impact in your personal, political, social, and economic spheres of
influence in our world. Make us proud to count you among the ranks of the Tippie MBA alumni. Graduates, you are now
part-owners of the great University of Iowa Tippie MBA program. Go out with confidence and invest the currency of your education. I would like to, once
again, thank our speaker Perry Glasgow for his inspiring comments. Perry, will you please
join me at the podium? I’d like to give you this expression of our appreciation– – Thank you.
– for your presentation today. – Thank you.
– Thank you, Perry. (audience applauses) As we leave today, I ask that the audience please remain seated
while our graduates exit. If you’re going to join us for brunch, the event is in the Coral Ballroom, which is down the hall to the left as you exit the conference center. Thank you all for
celebrating with us today, and we trust you will enjoy the remainder of your day together. Thank you. (audience applauses) (violin music)