Top 5 Scariest Places In Lovecraftian Fiction – Part 2

Top 5 Scariest Places In Lovecraftian Fiction – Part 2


We’re back guys–and it certainly wasn’t
long, because as several of you will know–the longer that you linger within the outskirts
of all time and space, the more prominent the calling comes when you slip back and forth
between the Dreamlands. Oh, wait. I mean–that’s how it goes for everyone,
right? The point is–it’s been a long time coming
for us to traverse the infinite landscapes of the Cthulhu Mythos–and merely a part one
of this series simply won’t suffice. Lovecraft, and many of his contemporaries
fleshed out an entire cosmos of cosmic horror for us to painstakingly stumble through–so
I guess we better get back to it. Hello horror fans, what’s going on–and
once again welcome back to the scariest channel on YouTube–Top 5 Scary Videos. As per usual, I’ll be your horror host Jack
Finch–as today, we curiously take a look at the Top 5 Scariest Places In Lovecraftian
Fiction–Part 2. Roll the clip. For the curious amongst you–that clip was
from Clive Barker’s awesome 1990 monster spectacular–Nightbreed, which depicts that
very strange place at the bottom of a graveyard, Midian. Of course it’s true–gods an astronaut,
Oz is over the rainbow–and Midian is where the monsters live! And believe it or not–Midian is technically
considered to be a place in the Cthulhu Mythos–given the fact that it’s widely considered to
be smack-bang right there in the Dreamlands! Or–well, maybe Clive Barker just had a thing
for Lovecraft. But yeah–there we guy, today’s most honorable
of honorable mentions. Let’s begin, shall we? Kicking off at Number 5–The Severn Valley And believe it or not–this one hits a little
close to home for me, given the fact that–well–the River Severn is very much a real river in
England, and I grew up not so far from the *actual* Severn Valley. Ehhh… yeah, that might explain a few things. Forget about that for a moment though–because
what we’re concerned with is The Severn Valley of the Cthulhu Mythos–and just like
how Lovecraft himself had his own Fictional County of Arkham in New England–so too did
one of the brilliant later writers of cosmic horror–Ramsey Campbell. Although, in the real world The Severn Valley
is primarily in Wales and the West Midlands–this version of Campbell Country lies roughly between
the cities of Gloucester and Bristol–and much like Arkham, it’s home to some pretty
terrifying pit stops. You see, just like Arkham has the Miskatonic
University–the Severn Valley has Brichester University–albeit much more mundane and home
to the manky cracks in the fabric of reality. Perhaps the most terrifying place in The Severn
Valley–undoubtedly–is the Goatswood, and if you’re familiar with Shub-Niggurath,
AKA The Black Goat of the Woods with A Thousand Young–then you’ll know that the Goatswood
is a place that you certainly wouldn’t want to stumble toward after a few nightcaps by
the River Severn. First described in The Moon Lens–the Goatswood,
at first glance is merely an isolated town in the middle of a dense forest–close set
dull-red roofs–narrow streets–encircling forests that all seem somehow furtive. As if they’re hiding something that just
shouldn’t be. And that’s before you’d meet the residents
of the town, though–the locals of The Goatswood, described by Campbell as being revoltingly
goat like–resembling a medieval woodcut of a satyr–clad in grotesquely voluminous garments–endlessly
worshipping their perverse fertility deity–the All-Mother, The Black Goat of the Woods. Yeah, I wouldn’t recommend it for a day-trip. Swinging in at Number 4–The Nameless City And despite being pretty damn vague–The Nameless
City is actually one of the most fully formed locations in the Lovecraft Mythos. Go figure, right? Once again, ambiguity reigns supreme. First appearing in Lovecraft’s 1921 short
story of the same name–The Nameless City is an ancient ruin, roughly located somewhere
in the vast expansive deserts of the Arabian Peninsula. It’s origin is mired in ancient mystery–but
it is certainly older than any human civilization. In ancient times–it was said that The Nameless
City was built and inhabited by an unnamed race of reptiles–with a body roughly shaped
like a hybrid between a crocodile and a seal–with a strange head common to neither–and a set
of bizarre horns atop an alligator-like jaw. Errrr–yeah. Sound pretty gross, right? Well–even stranger still–these creatures
moved by crawling on their bellies–and so the architecture of the Nameless City are
endless rows of incredibly low ceilings. Now–how would a race of belly-crawling crocodiles
build the capital city of an ancient civilization? Yeah–welcome to cosmic horror. As is explained in the Necronomicon by the
notorious mad poet Abdul Alhazred, The Nameless City is the place that he dreamed of on the
night before he sang his unexplained couplet–That is not dead which can eternal lie–and with
strange aeons, even death may die. You see, part of the terrifying intrigue to
The Nameless City is the concept of a long, lost–alien race–far more powerful and far
more intelligent than mankind ever could be. The theme itself would go on to inspire countless
cosmic horror and sci-fi authors who took the concept of an impossible antiquity and
left it for bewildered human explorers to discover. The Nameless City, in many ways, exemplifies
the entire point of cosmic horror–the evidence of something far, far more powerful than our
civilization could ever be–even if it *is* a set of ancient ruins buried deep in the
middle of a forgotten desert. Next up at Number 3–Unknown Kadath And yeah–of course–and while with this entry,
I *am* pretty much including the whole of the Dreamlands–as detailed in Lovecraft’s
1927 novel, The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath–the final destination of the whole horrifying
tour, is the ancient city of Kadath–home of the dream-gods of the Mortal Plane–the
Great Ones. You see, as Randolph Carter himself found
out throughout Lovecraft’s novel–the precise location of the city that he dreamt of, Kadath,
is entirely uncertain in the universe–and there is a dense confusion as to whether it
exists in the dream world of the Dreamlands–or indeed, in the waking world–or, even further
still–in a bizarre mixture of both. You see, in our previous video–we spoke about
the strange inter-spatial properties of many Lovecraftian Locations. Particularly with the incomprehensible Plateau
of Leng–it is also strongly suggested throughout many other examples of Lovecraft’s fiction–that
Kadath is actually located beyond the Antarctic Plateau that appears in At The Mountains of
Madness. And yeah–whilst many people called for that
location to appear on this list–it has already. Twice! Plateau of Leng. Kadath. It’s bigger on the inside than it is on
the outside–it’s anyone’s guess, really. The thing is though–despite the eternal uncertainty
as to where this ancient city actually is–with it’s bizarre massive pillars of stone–it
*is* discovered by Randolph Carter at the end of the novel. After his trek into the cold waste–and his
passing through the ancient ruins of Sarkomand–Carter ultimately ends his journey at Kadath and
the abode of the gods. And guess what? He finds it empty. Nothing–barren, desolate, abandoned. Not the city that he dreamt of as a child–just
a husk of nothingness. But then–a strange, pharoah like man appears
from the distance–leading a massive procession of the inhabitants of the Dreamlands. And guess what? It’s Nyarlathothep. And what does he do to Randolph Carter, after
all of that? He tells him a lie–slaps him on a massive
bird–and sends him flying through time and space toward the court of Azathoth. Now, I’m not sure about you–but Lovecraft
didn’t have a very optimistic outlook on impossible dreams. Sad–really. Coming in at Number 2–N’kai And this may way be one of my favourite places
in the whole of Lovecraftian Fiction–mainly because it’s perhaps the most metal place
in the whole of the ancient cavernous city of Yoth–which we’ll maybe touch on in a
later video, but yeah–put it this way. Yoth is already a terrifying enough place–and
in that regard, N’Kai is the most popular joint in town. Also known as the Black Realm, The Gulf of
N’Kai–The Black Abyss–The Gulfs of Nether Horror–N’kai first garnered mention in
Lovecraft’s 1931 novella, The Whisperer In Darkness. It is described as a vast, lightless cavern
below Yoth–it is home to the Great Old One Tsathoggua, which we’ll get to in the moment–and
is whispered to be a place of lightless, inky seas in which the unspeakable race of Shoggoths
roll and splash hideously. As detailed in The Whisperer In Darkness–there
are openings which human beings know nothing of–some of them in these very Vermont hills–great
worlds of unknown life down there–blue-litten K’n-yan, red-litten Yoth–and black, lightless
N’kai. The thing is though, it’s heavily alluded
to that N’kai is far, far older than both Yoth and K’n’yan–and that they were both
built upon by these surviving races of ancient civilizations–almost like looking at the
rings in some impossibly old tree. It is said that N’kai was discovered in
term, after aeons–by each extinct civilization–and because of that, N’kai is right at the bottom
of them all. And perhaps the reason for that–is that the
Great Old One himself–Tsathoggua–has made this place his home for all eternity. The amorphous, toad-like god-creature first
mentioned in the Pnakotic Manuscripts and the Necronomicon. It is said that in the centre of N’kai–there
is a squat, plain temple of black basalt blocks without a single carving–and containing only
a vacant onyx pedestal. It was built to house a very terrible black
toad-idol–that of the toad–which had always been there, at the bottom of the endless depths
of the black realm. Just a temple of darkness–and the toad. And finally–coming in at our Number 1 spot–Azathoth’s
Court And we did briefly mention this in our Number
3 entry–where the unfortunate Randolph Carter was strapped to a canter-bird by Nyarlathothep
himself and ushered forward to Azathoth’s Court at the centre of the universe. Fortunately for him, he woke up from his metaphysical
dream before any of that could come to fruition–but if he would have arrived at his destination–yeah,
our minds cannot even comprehend the eternal torment that would have befallen him. As noted in The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath–outside
the ordered universe is that amorphous blight of nethermost confusion, which blasphemes
and bubbles at the centre of all infinity–the home of boundless daemon sultan Azatoth. Here, it is said that unlighted chambers beyond
time and space exist amidst the muffled, maddening beating of vile drums and the thin monotonous
whine of accursed flutes. Yeah. It’s always flutes, right? What is it with cosmic horror and flutes? Hey, we may never know. The point is though, in many ways–The Court
of Azathoth is both the end game and the origin of cosmic horror. If we take the mythologies laid out by Lovecraft
as gospel–then the Court of Azathoth–outside of existence as we know it, is where it all
began–and for any human being to ever even comprehend the physicalities of this place–their
mind would collapse and splinter into infinitesimal fragments of nothingness. You see, there can be no definite description
of the Blind Idiot God himself because every glimpsed vision of him is perceived differently–and
his existence is constantly shifting and changing. However, in the Cthulhu mythos–there *is*
some evidence that the physical manifestation of Azathoth and his court is directly in the
centre of our galaxy–a place otherwise known as Sagittarius A*–the supermassive black
hole at the centre of the Milky Way. And yeah–fiction aside, there *is* a supermassive
black hole at the centre of the Milky Way known as Sagittarius A*. Is it Azathoth’s Court? I’m saying nothing. Well, there we have it folks–our list for
the Top 5 Scariest Places In Lovecraftian Fiction–Part 2. What did you guys think? Feel good to stretch our legs through the
landscape of cosmic horror? Let us know your thoughts down in the comment
section below, as well as any choice picks of your own. Before we depart from today’s video though,
why don’t we first take a quick look at some of your more creative comments from over
the past few days. First up, ensitu says– When will this man learn to speak English? — Hey, come on buddy–I’m trying my hardest
here. It’s a difficult language. And finally, Steampunk Pixie says– I think you are doing a Great Job. Do not let the grammar police get to you Jack. — And you know what, thank you very much
Steampunk Pixie–and thank you to everyone who has a kind retort–but, I do have to clear
it up. When I pick comments like that, I’m just
having a bit of fun. If you can’t laugh at yourself–what can
you laugh at? On that note, unfortunately that’s all we’ve
got time for in todays video–cheers for sticking around all the way until the end. If you were a fan of this video, or just Top
5 Scary Videos in general–then please, be a dear and hit that thumbs up button, as well
as that subscribe bell, and I’ll be seeing you in the next one. As per usual, I’ve been your horror host
Jack Finch–you’ve been watching Top 5 Scary Videos–and until next time, you take it easy