Just the Job – Clothing Maker/Pattern Cutter

Just the Job – Clothing Maker/Pattern Cutter


Clinton: Hi and welcome to Just the Job – the
show which gives you a behind-the-scenes insight into a huge range of exciting career opportunities.
This week, we’ve got a special programme looking at great training and career opportunities
in the Fashion industry. Ava: Hi, I’m Ava, I’m in Year 12 at St
Marys College and I’m interested in a career in fashion with New Zealand Fashion Tech. Clinton: We are all surrounded by fashion.
The creativity that surrounds the way we dress as an individual, culture or country, is what
makes us unique. Clinton: Ava is going to learn about a career
in the fashion industry with New Zealand’s leading educator in fashion and sewn products,
New Zealand Fashion Tech. Clinton: She’s going to visit campuses in
Wellington and Auckland, and then get a taste of work experience with two leading fashion
brands. Kevin: It’s a creative industry, but you’ve
got to be really practical as well – it’s a good balance. It’s always changing, it’s
always interesting. There’s nothing ever the same, it’s a vital industry and it’s
actually, for all the look of it that it’s a glamorous industry, it’s pretty cutthroat
and it’s a busy industry. Clinton: Ava has headed first to the New Zealand
Fashion Tech campus in Wellington. Tutor Verena Tilson-Scoble is on hand to show her round. Verena: I’m Verena, nice to meet you. Ava: Nice to meet you too. Verena: Let’s get started! Ava: Alright. Clinton: Both Auckland and Wellington offer
three programmes – there’s Garment Technology, Pattern Design, and then an advanced diploma. Ava: So what happens in this room here? Verena: This is our garment technology class,
and this is our first class that the students come to and they learn how to sew on the industrial
machinery, so they learn to sew accurately and to time. Ava: And roughly how like does it take to
get the knack of, or pick up the industrial sewing machine? Verena: Everybody is different! It depends
on the person. Clinton: All instruction is geared to what
the fashion industry requires -a thorough knowledge of garment construction, and good
basic sewing skills that can be confidently undertaken at speed. Clinton: Here in Wellington Miriam Gibson
is the Garment Technology course tutor. Miriam: Keep it controlled on the straight
part, don’t lose the plot on the straight part, hand in close to the back tack. Clinton: First there’s a run down on personal
safety. Miriam: So the first thing is you just need
to tuck your necklace in, because we need to get rid of anything dangly. Clinton: Long hair is a big no-no, and accurate
operation of machine pedals is important, so flat shoes are a must too. Clinton: First Ava’s introduced to an industrial
sewing machine. Miriam: So what happened is we ran out of
bobbin thread – and as you can see my bobbin is empty, so I need to change that. So I’ve
already wound our spare bobbin over here. Miriam: On the course it’s very hands-on.
Most people that come to us come because they love to make things, they’re very tactile,
they love to do things, so we keep the class lessons, as we call them, to a minimum – mostly
it’s all about learning by doing. It’s more of a workroom environment. Clinton: Well, no problems for Ava here. Ava: Awesome! Miriam: There you go, you did really well! Thank you! Miriam: Some of the things that the students
do, in the first part of the class we’re still getting to know each other, is they’ll
do a weaving project where they’ll wave a basket and they’ll do a knitting project
where they knit this teddy, so a lot of them haven’t done this before, and while they
sort of think that it’s fun and its social and it’s creative, what the students are
actually learning is how woven fabrics and knitted fabrics are constructed. Clinton: Industrial machines run about 5 times
faster than domestic machines, so there’s quite a learning curve here. Miriam: That’s great, now just a little
jiggle…jiggle jiggle…just to get you started. It doesn’t matter if you stop a little bit
– you don’t want to start off with a surge. Miriam: That’s really good…that’s good…can
you feel that? Ava: Yeah. Miriam: Yeah, then we bring this hand down
to here as you move, so it’s like a spider walking, it’s like – you know those little
robots that you get, and their feet go creak, creak, creak, like that? Ava: Yeah! Miriam: It’s like that ok? That’s what
you’re going to be like but it’s going to come towards you. Ava: Righto! Alright! Miriam: Speed is very important so we have
to be constantly trying to strike that balance between quality and time. Clinton: There is also an introduction to
the spec sheet, the all-important document which records the information about a garment.
Measurements, quantities, work minutes required, costs, all relevant facts required to produce
a garment commercially. Miriam: So what’s happening is all the students
are working through their production workbook, which has all the exercise in it that you
need to cover in CGT. They’re all at different stages, so you can see we’ve got Saskia
over here working on her little mini T shirts, and she’s going to be doing 40 of those,
and we do 40 so you can have a lot of practice and get the repetition you really learn the
exercise well. Kevin: We teach our students communication,
they work in teams, they learn to develop their own learning styles, recognise their
earning styles and develop other learning styles. We teach them how to present ideas
clearly and concisely across to other people as well as the technical skills so they’re
sort of learning all aspects of their development and the most successful students come from
the fact that we have an absolute maximum of 17 students for each tutor in a class. Ava: Alright! Miriam: Ok, so once you’ve learnt all the
basic operations, we put them together in to garment construction. SO once you’ve
finished your over-locking, you’re going to make a T shirt like this, you’ll learn
how to put the rib on and finish that off. You’re going to make a shirt so each garment
shows you how we can use different techniques. Miriam: So this is the pattern designing area,
which is our second course and the students learn how to draft patterns, they also grade
everything they make as well as well as spec sheet and they get to sew everything as well. Clinton: Doula Matheos is tutor for the Pattern
Design Certificate course. Doula: So the first job you’re going to
do is to make a cover for your set-square. Clinton: And Ava’s going to use a pattern
that she’s drawn up to do that. Clinton: The shape is accurately measured
out and then drawn… Clinton: …then this first draft is transferred
to the much stronger pattern card using pin pricks as markers… Clinton: …and the pattern sheet can then
be drawn and cut. Kevin: The second programme certificate of
Pattern Design is teaching all the skills involved for making patterns for men’s’,
woman’s’ and children’s patterning, because each of those have different rules,
and then all of the design adaptations that are possible, so making a straight skirt into
a flared one or a flounced one or gores or pleats or whatever. Doula: Ok, so now we’re going to chalk around
and cut it out… Doula: …but you’re not going o be using
scissors today, you’re going to be using this thing here. Ava: Alright. Clinton: Cutters like this are fast and powerful,
they have to be used with steel mesh gloves. Electrical sound of cutter. Doula: Very nice…well done. Ava: It’s quite fun! Kevin: The exciting thing about the fashion
industry is that there is 97 different jobs that we’ve sort of managed to itemise at
the moment. It’s such a diverse industry, because throughout all the glamour and the
shoots and the styling and that sort of presentation, backed up with that is the fact that the deadline
is next Friday and if this range isn’t prepared in time and gotten to the customer by next
Friday, they’re going to cancel that order. Verena: How’s it been going? Ava: Really good! It’s been really interesting
– I’ve learnt so much. Verena: We’ve got more to show you up at
our Auckland Campus. Ava: Cool!