How To Print On Envelopes At Home

How To Print On Envelopes At Home


Hi, I’m Josh from LCI Paper and today I’d
like to walk you through the steps of printing envelopes at home using your computer, your
printer, and Microsoft Word. Now printing envelopes at home can be a time
saver and it can also save you money, depending on your calligraphy skills or depending on
what a calligrapher might have charged if you were to go that route. Most people are experts when it comes to printing
8 1/2 by 11 copy paper at home or at work but printing envelopes requires some extra
steps. I’m going to walk you through the process. In my accompanying blog article, you’ll
find all of the steps and you’ll find some extra considerations so I strongly recommend
that you follow along the article as well as watching this video. In this video I’m going to be showing you
how to print on a 5 1/4 by 7 1/4 envelope, called an A7 envelope, like this. We’ll be printing names and an address. But the same principles and the same instructions
will apply to virtually any size envelope that you’ll be printing like these three
sizes or even Double Wedding Envelopes. Step 1: Load the envelope into your printer. With the flap closed, load the short edge
first into your printer and then adjust the plastic sliding guide to rest flush against
the left edge of your envelope. Step 2: In Word, set up your document. Create a new document sized to the same dimensions
as your envelope. So for this example my envelope is 5 1/4 high
by 7 1/4 inches wide. I’m going to set these same dimensions but
in decimals because that’s how Word likes it. So 5.25 inches high by 7.25 inches wide. Type in the first name and address from your
guest list. Customize the text by choosing a specific
font that you like and a font size and center the text at this point. When everything looks the way you’d like
it to be printed, you’re all set to move forward to Step 3. Access the printer driver and enter the envelope’s
height, width, and alignment. Even though you loaded your envelope correctly
in Step 1, the printer still assumes that you’ve got an 8 1/2 by 11 sheet of copy
paper, so you do need to enter your printer driver and enter a custom size. Since your envelope is loaded on its side,
short edge first, the width becomes the shorter dimension, in this example 5 1/4, and the
height becomes the longer dimension, 7 1/4. All this is accessed in the printer’s software
or “driver” and the specific PC and Mac instructions are in my article. Step 4: Print 1 envelope as a test. Now the reason that we strongly suggest printing
a sample envelope first is that we need to see if the printed test results meets your
requirement. There are a few things to look for. First of all, does the text print as you were
hoping? Is the text sharp and saturated on the envelope? Another thing to consider; is the envelope
still in excellent shape after running through your printer? Certain printers have a sharp turn that can
damage the envelope so make sure your envelope still looks pristine, especially if it’s
a special event. Also, depending on the type of envelope you
use, whether a matte finish like this, a linen finish, a metallic finish, you’ve gotta
make sure that your printer gives you the quality that you’re looking for. Otherwise, you may want to choose a different
type of envelope or you may want to look at a different printer to use for this job. Bottom line: Only by testing the actual envelope
in your specific printer can you determine the actual results. Step 5: Print your envelopes. There are two ways to print envelopes that
are going to different addresses. The first way is just to go back to your Word
document, change the name and address, and print an envelope. Just repeat the process for each address. And the second is a more advanced technique
and that’s printing your envelopes all at once using Microsoft Word’s Mail Merge feature
and we’ve provided a link to that article in this article. If you have any questions about printing envelopes
at home, get in touch with us so we can help you.