Finding Jobs in Research

Finding Jobs in Research


Hello and welcome. My name is Derek
Smith and I’m a career strategist with the Academic Advising and Career Center (AA&CC)
over the next few minutes I will be your guide as we walk through the process of
understanding how to be successful in finding jobs and research. In this
webinar, we’re going to cover the following items; what research questions
matter to you, what research opportunities can you find
in the research catalog, what is it, where is it and what’s in it for you. Where can
you find other research opportunities? How can you get research experience such
as documentation, references, time management and application management. In
this webinar we’re going to focus on research jobs, what you need to consider,
where to find research opportunities and how to get experience. All research
begins with questions. Faculty members regardless of the field of studies who
are lead investigators on research studies, begin the research with key
questions that have not yet been answered. In high school we learn the
answers to understand, in university we apply the answers research the answers
provided by others. We critique the answers to deepen our understanding in
pure and applied research, we ask questions, we explore questions we
speculate about questions. We theorize and hypothesize about answers, we test
our theories hypothesis, we discover and create new knowledge and new answers. If
you want to distinguish yourself through research roles be they volunteer or paid,
start to pay attention to questions that you care about, this will motivate you to
learn more deeply what are you curious about. What would you like to explore?
What questions have you had that haven’t been asked before or need to be asked
now? These are questions you need to be exploring to uncover your research area
focus and exploration. It’s important to identify what field you want to focus
your interest in whether it’s science, government or business. Research is beneficial to you because it
is what is considered an opportunity for deep learning. If you look at the nine
examples here of high-impact practices for deep learning, you will see that
research is potentially an experience that could be considered a focus and
most of them there are a variety of high impact practices also HIP for you to
consider all of them offering you the opportunity for deep learning with a
specific field or discipline. Relationship with faculty can be built
in small ways but often students hesitate to engage. Even by fourth year,
over a third of students still never talk to faculty outside of class and
very few claim very often. Another small way to build relationships with faculty is
speaking with faculty about your career plans gives you access to their
experienced thoughts insight that may inform you and your thinking and support
your decisions for pursuing jobs. Faculty is a resource available to you,
getting to know them and letting them know you can create greater
opportunities. Not to mention, they want to get to know you and support your
interests. Doing this early on will help you navigate the different opportunities,
explore your interests and perhaps decide to continue into higher education.
So now that you’re motivated to think about what research questions matter to
you, and are thinking more seriously about engaging with faculty early, let’s
take a closer look at the research catalog and how it can help you with
these tasks let’s take a look at the research opportunities that exists, where to
find them and how to get them access to the research catalog is through CLN. On
the left-hand navigation bar, you’ll see a tab named research catalog. How to find
faculty. Go to the department homepage. Click on people to find the faculty you
want to find out more about. Take a look at the various faculty of interest, the
profiles list contact information and research interests. Which helps you
identify which faculty you want to approach.The research catalog is just one example of where you can find both faculty and
institutional information about research opportunities affiliated with the
University of Toronto. But there are many other places where you can get valuable
research experience which will build transferable career skills. There are a
number of places to find other research opportunities, you are not limited to
paid opportunities or on-campus. Volunteer with an outside organization, tit
might be a good place to start to build your credentials and to better qualify
you for paid positions, not to mention the opportunity to learn and
to grow. You can use the CLN job board to find opportunities. Here’s how you can
access jobs, and note all the job boards, except for casual job boards. Here’s how
you can access jobs and note that all the job boards except for the casual job
boards, have a field that asks employers, is this a research opportunity? Meaning
that you can filter by field and narrow down the many opportunities to only
those that are research intended. The salient posts open research positions.
Check often to see what’s new, don’t wait till January, but act now
the numbers are significant. And finally from an industry perspective, here are
the sectors that tend to hire students through research related jobs. Here are
other resources you can explore. If you’re uncertain about how to find out
what exists or how to apply, attend our other webinars, such as jobs or
strategies, resume writing, networking to develop the knowledge and skills to
approach these sources. If you’ve done so and feel you need additional support to
review your poche arrange to speak with a career staff at the Academic Advising
and Career Center. Many of these resources post jobs. Or they have
information about research projects at hire students, so are worth bookmarking
and visiting. Here are the number of additional resources. The goal of the
research catalog was to encourage students to take a plain full approach
to gaining research experiences programs tend to be competitive and require
serious well researched approach. Therefore, if you really want to be
competitive for a research program, you will need to want to anticipate at least
eight week timeline to get your application together. Like in the process
of a course or the application to a graduate school, planning instruction
your timing is important. This is an example of a timeline that starts with
research and ends with sending your application, and along the way, there is
work developing your material, securing your references, setting up meetings
support, getting feedback and input to finalize and complete your application
package to be able to push and send. This takes some time, it’s not a last-minute
decision. Build it into your schedule to ensure your success. Assess your
readiness for research experience, understand the levels of research, audit your
currents goals and match opportunities, have elements of preparedness in place
to be ready for opportunities, as they arise. It’s important to rate yourself on
what your best research skills are now, and which ones do you want to develop
next. Here’s a list of the various aspects you need to consider in
assessing your readiness and qualifications. Run through the list
check out the ones you’re satisfied you meet to identify the ones you need to
develop. This will help you with your application, expressing your strengths,
and it will help you identify where you need to gain some experience, or some
skills to develop. Have you asked for a faculty reference? You ever wanted to ask
for one? If you ever wanted to know about how to go through the process of doing
so? The following slides walk you through
the micro steps of who, what, where, when and how how do you go about getting a
reference. This is an important step in the application process for research
positions and also for other jobs. When considering who to approach, think about
whether you did well in the class, if the professor knows you, whether the course
is relevant to the position, and what the professor’s availability is. This list
also helps you to identify what you need to start doing to ready yourself for
future positions. Start to make a point to get to know your professors, consider
the type of research you would like to do, and whether the course lines up also
get good grades. What is the method of reference required
by the program you’re applying to? Is a written reference required? Is electronic
reference required? Will the professor be responsible for sending the reference
directly or is an applicant responsible for that?
Is the Professor ready to fill out the form? If so, will this form be sent to the
institution you’re applying to or will be required to provide this form? These
are different types of references that are asked for by the institution. Get
clear on what they want read and follow their instructions, they will require a
specific type of reference, and indicate who is responsible for submitting or
collecting it. This is a sample reference from. The professor needs to indicate how
they know you, and how long they’ve known you. This form illustrates why it’s
important to choose a professor who knows you well. The sample indicates who
is a form style with specific questions. The sample indicates who is a form style
with specific questions to be completed by the professor. The referee is being asked
to rank the students relative to other students. Once you familiarize yourself
with the requirements so that the what of the reference then you can package
the information for the professor as well. To make the process of providing a
reference easier for the professor, consider providing them with a package
containing the following; an unofficial transcript of your academic history such
as the printer from acorn, an updated resume or CV, a draft of any statement of
interest or research application. If this is a requirement of the position you’re
applying for, any required forms, a letter stating who you are, which research
program you’re applying for, and why you’re interested in the position, the
method of the reference, does this professor mail it? Will they pick it up?
If so, when? And any additional instructions. Make sure you provide you
referee with a complete package of all the necessary
material to help them give a fair and favorable reference. Your academic
performance your, collateral material and your application letter and any forms of
completion. In your letter include a brief introduction your interest in the
particular research and any instructions they need to complete. It’s your
job to make it easy for them and to say yes to fulfill your requests. Where can I
contact my professor? Should I do it in person? Should I call them? Should I email
them? None of these are incorrect platforms to ask your professor for a
reference. It actually depends on the professor’s preferred method of
communication. Does the professor have a reference letter policy? Check their
website and the departmental website. If they do, then ensure your following the
policy. If the professor does not have a formalized reference policy, then start
by approaching them with the method you have been accustomed to when you took
the class with them. Before reaching out it is good to know if the professor has
a reference policy in place, if they do, adhere to it. The method of requesting
their support will depend in part on what your relation is and what your
usual communication is with them. This will determine in part whether to
request in person by phone or by email. Often the email indicating that you
would like to arrange a time to speak in person or by phone gives the professor a
chance to consider the request, advise you on the policy if they have one, or
identify the best time to speak with you. This way, you can account for professors
on leave, or temporary absence. Start brainstorming and researching out to
professors as soon as possible. It’s never too early, you don’t know what
demands and time constraints the professor may be dealing with. You want
to give them as much time as you can, you don’t want them to decline your request
because they don’t have the time. The sooner the better, and if you learn that
they can’t or unwilling to, you have time to approach a different professor. Asking
a faculty member for reference. How? Whether your email, phone or in
person, include a friendly and professional greeting. Context, how you
know or have studied or worked with the professor, any summer research programs
of interest. Request for a reference. availability to meet should it be
necessary. Write a thank-you note. Keep your files in order and provide a
pre stamped and addressed envelope if mailing is necessary. Be well-organized,
keep copies of everything you submit. File it in a folder or location that’s
easy and obvious to you, always say thank you in person, followed by handwritten
note or email. Follow-up to let them know the status, they are invested in your
success whether or not you’re successful they will want to know the outcome.
Remember to send a thank-you note even though that through email or a written
card. If professor is required to mail the reference letter, consider providing
them with an addressed envelope and covering the cost of the stamp or a
postage. If the professor is required to fill out the form, try to fill out as
much of the form as you can. Here’s an overview of everything we have covered.
It’s a great checklist for you to evaluate whether you’re ready and what
next steps you need to take. This is a summary of key preparation activities
also summarized in your handout, thank you for your time. More help please visit
the Academic Advising and Career Center, and make an appointment with one of our
career staff who can help you further on your journey.